Title

Self-reported physical activity using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) in Australian adults with type 2 diabetes, with and without peripheral neuropathy.

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

Elsevier BV

Place of Publication

Netherlands

School

School of Medical and Health Sciences

RAS ID

21928

Comments

Originally published as: Nolan, R. C., Raynor, A. J., Berry, N. M., & May, E. J. (2016). Self-reported Physical Activity Using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) in Australian adults with type 2 diabetes, with and without peripheral neuropathy. Canadian Journal of Diabetes, 40(6), 576-579. Available here.

Abstract

Objectives The aim of this study was to survey the level of self-reported physical activity in people with type 2 diabetes, with and without peripheral neuropathy. Methods A sample of South Australian adults (n=481) 33 to 88 years of age who had type 2 diabetes, including 55 people with peripheral neuropathy, completed the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ). Levels of self-reported physical activity were compared between those with and without peripheral neuropathy. Results People with type 2 diabetes and peripheral neuropathy (median [Mdn]=1433; interquartile range [IQR]=495 to 3390 metabolic equivalent minutes per week [MET-min/wk]) were less physically active than those without peripheral neuropathy (Mdn=2106; IQR=876 to 4380 MET-min/wk) (p=0.04). A total of 49% of people with type 2 diabetes and peripheral neuropathy met physical activity recommendations of 150 minutes of at least moderate activity per week, compared to 57% of people with type 2 diabetes alone. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that people with type 2 diabetes and peripheral neuropathy reported being significantly less active than people with type 2 diabetes alone. People with type 2 diabetes and peripheral neuropathy need to be encouraged to perform higher levels of physical activity for biologic, physical and psychological benefits. Further studies using objective measures of physical activity are required to support these results. © 2016 Canadian Diabetes Association

DOI

10.1016/j.jcjd.2016.05.013

Share

 
COinS