Title

A Study of the exposure to wood dust and potential impact on lung function

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

C C H Australia Ltd

School

School of Medical and Health Sciences

RAS ID

22518

Comments

Originally published as: Filippin, P., Ree, S. & Cross, M. (2016). A Study of the exposure to wood dust and potential impact on lung function. Australian & New Zealand Journal of Health, Safety and Environment, 32(1), 32-122. Original article available here.

Abstract

This paper investigates the correlation between exposure to wood dust and a decrement in lung function. There is abundant literature on the adverse health effects of wood dust, including: irritation, allergic rhinitis, dermal and lung sensitisation, asthma, and for certain wood species such as oak-nasal cancer. The results of the inhalable wood dust sampling demonstrated that one SEG had exposure levels above the exposure standard of 5 mg/m3 for softwood, due to tasks undertaken without appropriate controls. Statistical analysis of the data demonstrated that while there was a difference in the mean values of FEV 1 and FVC between pre- and post-shift, the correlation between wood dust exposure and a decrement in lung function was weak.

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