Title

Do guilt-and shame-proneness differentially predict prosocial, aggressive, and withdrawn behaviors during early adolescence?

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

American Psychological Association

Faculty

Faculty of Health, Engineering and Science

School

School of Exercise and Health Sciences

RAS ID

19299

Comments

This article was originally published as: Roos S., Hodges E.V.E., Salmivalli C. (2014). Do guilt-and shame-proneness differentially predict prosocial, aggressive, and withdrawn behaviors during early adolescence?. Developmental Psychology, 50(3), 941-946. Original article available here

Abstract

In this short-term longitudinal study, we systematically examined the distinctiveness of guilt- and shame-proneness in early adolescents (N = 395, mean age = 11.8 years) in terms of differential relations with peer reported prosocial behavior, withdrawal, and aggression. Results from structural equation modeling indicated that guilt-proneness concurrently predicted more aggressive and less prosocial behavior as well as subsequent increases in prosocial behavior. Shame-proneness predicted subsequent decreases in prosocial behavior. Although girls reported a greater proneness to experience guilt and shame than boys, the associations between the two dispositional emotions and social behaviors were found to be similar across time and gender.

DOI

10.1037/a0033904

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