Title

Perceptions and experiences of instrusive behavior and stalking: Comparing LGBTIQ and heterosexual groups

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

Sage Publications

School

School of Arts and Humanities

RAS ID

23879

Comments

Originally published as: Sheridan, L. P., Scott, A. J., & Campbell, A. M. (2016). Perceptions and experiences of intrusive behavior and stalking: Comparing LGBTIQ and heterosexual groups. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 1-22. Advance online publication. Original article available here

Abstract

The present research employed a mixed-methods approach and quasiexperimental design to examine perceptions and experiences of intrusive behavior (comprising 47 individual intrusive activities) within individuals identifying as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex, or queer (LGBTIQ) with a matched (in terms of age, sex, and income) sample of individuals identifying as heterosexual (N = 214). Despite only minor differences between the LGBTIQ and heterosexual groups concerning perceptions of the acceptability of intrusive behavior, the LGBTIQ group was more likely to report experiencing a range of individual intrusive activities and to report experiencing stalking victimization (self-reported rates of 35.5% vs. 15.0%). Participant sex and personal experience of being stalked were minimally associated with perceptions of the acceptability of intrusive behavior. Sexual orientation significantly predicted whether a person had experienced stalking victimization, whereas participant sex did not. The qualitative analysis revealed that the two groups shared some experiences of intrusive behavior, whereas others represented a unique subset of intrusions that related to sexual orientation.

DOI

10.1177/0886260516651313

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