Title

Maternal consumption of coffee and tea during pregnancy and risk of childhood brain tumors: results from an Australian case–control study

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

Kluwer Academic Publishers

Faculty

Faculty of Health, Engineering and Science

School

Child Health Promotion Research Centre

RAS ID

18685

Comments

This article was originally published as: Greenop K.R., Miller M., Attia J., Ashton L.J., Cohn R., Armstrong B.K., Milne E. (2014). Maternal consumption of coffee and tea during pregnancy and risk of childhood brain tumors: results from an Australian case–control study. Cancer Causes and Control, 25(10), 1321-1327. Original article available here

Abstract

Results: Data on coffee and tea consumption during pregnancy were available from 293 case mothers and 726 control mothers. Odds ratios (ORs) and confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using multivariable unconditional logistic regression. There was little evidence of an association between gestational consumption of any coffee (OR 1.23, 95 % CI 0.92, 1.64) or tea (OR 1.00, 95 % CI 0.74, 1.36) and CBT risk. Among children aged under 5 years, the OR for any coffee consumption during pregnancy was 1.76 (95 % CI 1.09, 2.84) and for ≥2 cups per day during pregnancy was 2.52 (95 % CI 1.26, 5.04). There was little evidence that associations with coffee or tea intake differed by parental smoking status.Conclusions: These results suggest a positive association between coffee intake ≥2 cups per day and risk of CBT in younger children, although some estimates are imprecise. There was no association between maternal tea drinking and risk of CBT.Purpose: The causes of childhood brain tumors (CBT) are largely unknown, but gestational diet may influence this risk. The aim of this analysis was to investigate whether maternal coffee or tea consumption during pregnancy was associated with the risk of CBT.Methods: The Australian Study of the Causes of Childhood Brain Tumours was a population-based, Australian case–control study conducted between 2005 and 2010. Case children were recruited from 10 pediatric oncology centers and control children by nationwide random-digit dialing, frequency matched to cases on the basis of age, sex and state of residence. Coffee and tea intake were assessed using a food frequency questionnaire.

DOI

10.1007/s10552-014-0437-8

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