Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

Routledge

Place of Publication

United Kingdom

Faculty

Faculty of Business and Law

School

School of Business

RAS ID

18136

Comments

Originally published as: Jackson D. (2016). Skill mastery and the formation of graduate identity Bachelor graduates: evidence from Australia. Studies in Higher Education, 41(7), 1313-1332. Original article available here

Abstract

Mastery of certain generic skills and the successful formation of pre-professional identity are widely considered to influence graduate work-readiness and job attainment. Given their links with enhanced productivity, performance and innovation, skill development and graduate identity appear critical amidst ongoing global stagnation in advanced economies. This paper focuses on the success of higher education in developing generic skills and graduate identity using national data (n = 80,891) for 51 providers. It investigates the influence of certain demographics, study and degree characteristics on these important areas of undergraduate curricula. Furthermore, it gauges recent graduate perceptions on the importance of skill development to post-graduation employment and how these beliefs vary across different employment contexts. Implications for how education practitioners can produce graduates with the skills, self-belief, outlook and confidence to attain a graduate-level job are discussed.

DOI

10.1080/03075079.2014.981515

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