Title

The cycles and spirals of justice in water-allocation decision making

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

Taylor & Francis (Routledge)

Faculty

Faculty of Health, Engineering and Science

School

School of Law and Justice

RAS ID

19311

Comments

This article was originally published as: Patrick M.J. (2014). The Cycles and Spirals of Justice in water-allocation decision making. Water International, 39(1), 63-80. Original article available here

Abstract

Managing for social and environmental justice in water allocation is a necessary yet challenging goal. Often, what can appear as a just or equitable outcome for a specific location or group of stakeholders can also result in injustices at other locations or for other stakeholders. This paper describes a conceptual framework, The Cycles and Spirals of Justice, that helps make sense of the relationship between justice and injustice in the context of water-allocation decision making by explicitly utilizing a landscape-ecology understanding of scale and levels. The framework is illustrated using a case study from the Murray-Darling Basin in Australia and describes how justice and injustice are part of a cycling continuum of "justice for whom" and how this plays out in a multi-level system where the problem of scale can surface.

DOI

10.1080/02508060.2013.863646

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