Title

Americans, Malibus, Torpedo Buoys, and Australian Beach culture

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

North American Society for Sport History

Faculty

Faculty of Health, Engineering and Science

School

School of Exercise and Health Sciences

RAS ID

18248

Comments

This article was originally published as: Jaggard E. (2014). Americans, Malibus, Torpedo Buoys, and Australian Beach culture. Journal of Sport History, 41(2), 269-286. Original article available here

Abstract

When the Surf Life Saving Association of Australia (SLSAA) invited American and Hawaiian lifeguards to compete at an international surf lifesaving carnival at Torquay, Victoria, in November of 1956, it did not foresee the far-reaching consequences of the tour. Noting that historians of the beach, and surfing in particular, frequently refer to the epochal significance of 1956, the paper utilizes predominantly surf lifesaving sources to explore the circumstances culminating in the month-long visit, discusses the appearance of Malibu boards, and then analyzes the consequences for Australian surf lifesaving in particular. The great irony of 1956 was that by welcoming the Americans and Hawaiians the SLSAA weakened its previous control over the beaches, as Australians found new ways to enjoy the surf.

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