Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

BioMed Central Ltd

Faculty

Faculty of Health, Engineering and Science

School

School of Natural Sciences/Centre for Ecosystem Management

RAS ID

17941

Comments

This article was originally published as: Wheeler, A. J., Dobbin, N., Heroux, M., Fisher, M., Sun, L., Khoury, C., Hauser, R., Walker, M., Ramsay, T., Bienvenu, J., LeBlanc, A., Daigle, E., Gaudreau, E., Belanger, P., Feeley, M., Ayotte, P., & Arbuckle, T. (2014). Urinary and breast milk biomarkers to assess exposure to naphthalene in pregnant women: an investigation of personal and indoor air sources. Environmental Health: A Global Access Science Source, 13(1), Article 30. Original article available here

The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

Abstract

Naphthalene exposures for most non-occupationally exposed individuals occur primarily indoors at home. Residential indoor sources include pest control products (specifically moth balls), incomplete combustion such as cigarette smoke, woodstoves and cooking, some consumer and building products, and emissions from gasoline sources found in attached garages. The study aim was to assess naphthalene exposure in pregnant women from Canada, using air measurements and biomarkers of exposure.

DOI

10.1186/1476-069X-13-30

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 License.

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