Title

Gramsci in Africa: The Relevance of Gramscian Concept to a History of Mozambique

Document Type

Conference Proceeding

Publisher

AFSAAP

Faculty

Faculty of Education and Arts

School

School of Communication and Arts

RAS ID

19084

Comments

This article was originally published as: Robinson, D. A. (2014). Gramsci in Africa: The Relevance of Gramscian Concept to a History of Mozambique. Proceedings of African Studies Association of Australasia and the Pacific Annual Conference. (pp. 10p.). Murdoch University, Perth. AFSAAP. Original article available here

Abstract

The aim of this project is the development of a history of Mozambique encompassing what I deem its modern ‘period of struggle’ from the 1940s through to the mid-1990s, taking into account the complex interactions of local, national, regional and global dynamics. As a history, this project will be empirically grounded in historical and ethnographic details which have a strong evidential basis, but I also aim to interpret this history through a Marxist theoretical framework, and particularly to utilise Gramscian categories of analysis to illuminate processes working at these ascending scales. This paper is essentially a prospectus concerning the viability of applying a Gramscian framework to the analysis of Mozambican history – a combination that I believe will be effective and enlightening.

Access Rights

free_to_read

Share

 
COinS