Title

Constantly connected - The effects of smart-devices on mental health

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

Elsevier

Faculty

Faculty of Business and Law

School

School of Law and Justice

RAS ID

18501

Comments

This article was originally published as: Harwood J., Dooley J.J., Scott A.J., Joiner R. (2014). Constantly connected - The effects of smart-devices on mental health. Computers in Human Behavior, 34(), 267-272. Original article available here

Abstract

A number of studies have demonstrated the mental health implications of excessive Internet-browsing, gaming, texting, emailing, social networking, and phone calling. However, no study to date has investigated the impact of being able to conduct all of these activities on one device. A smart-device (i.e., smart-phone or tablet) allows these activities to be conducted anytime and anywhere, with unknown mental health repercussions. This study investigated the association between smart-device use, smart-device involvement and mental health. Two-hundred and seventy-four participants completed an online survey comprising demographic questions, questions concerning smart-device use, the Mobile Phone Involvement Questionnaire, the Internet Addiction Test and the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales. Higher smart-device involvement was significantly associated with higher levels of depression and stress but not anxiety. However, smart-device use was not significantly associated with depression, anxiety or stress. These findings suggest that it is the nature of the relationship a person has with their smart-device that is predictive of depression and stress, rather than the extent of use.

DOI

10.1016/j.chb.2014.02.006

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