Australian Information Security Management Conference

Document Type

Conference Proceeding

Publisher

Security Research Centre, School of Computer and Security Science, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Western Australia

Comments

Originally published in the Proceedings of the 6th Australian Information Security Management Conference, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Western Australia, 1st to 3rd December 2006.

Abstract

Video over IP (VIP) is becoming a tool of communication in corporate environments to reduce the time spent conducting meetings face-to-face. This has been driven by efficiencies of time saving, management’s monitoring of staff and to communicate with flexibilities - without placing additional disadvantages on employees who must regularly attend personal meetings amongst hectic business schedules. With technology excelling beyond the old telegraphy of analogy video over hard copper wire to dark fibre technology, VIP is a technology that is starting to receive more attention in the corporate world as more organisations have the equipment to support this additional plug-in. But whilst corporate management may consider VIP a cost saving enterprise, the security implications it may pose to the information environment and internal networking communications are still a valid concern. This paper will review the risks for VIP systems in the corporate arena, and relevant models used in these systems will be analysed and reviewed for their specific networking vulnerabilities. This paper suggests much is still unknown about the risks VIP poses to uneducated corporate users and the technologically reliant business sector, and presents certain cases that support this argument.

DOI

10.4225/75/57b653c334761

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