Date of Award

1-1-2003

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Masters of Health Science

Faculty

Faculty of Computing, Health and Science

First Advisor

Dr Janis Jansz

Second Advisor

Associate Professor Lynne Hunt

Abstract

There is no official avenue in nursing for the reporting of incidences of covert violence to staff and so they remain unrecorded and often stressful. This study sought to collect data from currently employed nurses concerning covert violence in their workplace, and to collate the information to obtain a valid assessment of this hidden problem. A qualitative methodology was used to report on the experiences of nurses in relation to covert violence directed at them by their peers, other health professionals, patients and patients' families. The participants were all registered nurses employed by a suburban health service. Each was given an open-ended questionnaire to: 1. establish the participant's position and professional experience within the Health Service, 2. request for incidences regarding the various forms of covert violence encountered by them in the workplace, 3. describe how they dealt with such episodes It is anticipated that this study will lead to an acknowledgement of, and interventions to prevent, such forms of violence. It is also anticipated that minimising the occurrence of covert violence will improve nursing productivity, provide greater job satisfaction for nurses, and promote savings in terms of less staff absenteeism, Workers' Compensation insurance claims and staff turnover.

Included in

Nursing Commons

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