Title

A computer-supported EFL course : a pilot study for the professional education of pre-service teachers in higher education practice in Thailand

Date of Award

1-1-2008

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Doctor of Education

School

School of Education

Faculty

Faculty of Education and Arts

Abstract

English has been taught as a foreign language for over a century, and plays an important role at all levels of the Thai education system. At higher education levels, English skills are essential components of every pre-service teacher's professional education. In order to maximise opportunities for future teachers to develop their English skills, the teaching and learning of these skills has blended with the utilisation of ICT in many developed and developing countries. The research and the experiences of practitioners suggest that this new educational environment can benefit learning outcomes. This portfolio aimed to support the uptake and improvement of ICT and English in Thailand by exploring English as Foreign Language educational strategies for the Rajabhat Universities in particular and other universities' EFL strategies for pre-service teachers' professional education. This portfolio investigated the role of EFL courses and developed a computer-supported EFL course as a new learning model for EFL curricula and practice. The context is the development of pre-service teachers' professional knowledge and skills in English in Rajabhat Universities in Thailand. To do this, the portfolio firstly examined the existing literature on the history and nature of Thai education, along with the nature and implementation of ICT. The historical and current context of EFL education and training for EFL pre-service teachers in ICT use are examined. A small-scale investigation explored the extent to which the computer-supported EFL training course supports English proficiency. This investigation aimed to identify potential impact on EFL learning of teaching strategies, students' language learning strategies, and attitudes towards learning through computers. Results from the multi-method approach showed that the computer-support EFL training course enhances English learning prepositions. If students with little or no prior experience in multimedia software are able to demonstrate significant improvement in language skills, then it could be expected that such an approach might be viewed as a viable alternative pedagogical approach. The workplace experiences and the engagement of students in such environment and the perspectives of EFL teachers and administrators all support the proposition that interactive multimedia activities which integrate language skills and multi-tasking result in increased motivation to learn and improve learning. This outcome highlights the possible contribution of ICT use in EFL classroom teaching and learning. Teaching and learning strategies and processes coupled with the findings from this portfolio will provide guidance for staff to integrate the ICT in EFL teaching and learning situations, but also to voice and serve the teachers and students' needs in the future development of ICT use in EFL education. English has been taught as a foreign language for over a century, and plays an important role at all levels of the Thai education system. At higher education levels, English skills are essential components of every pre-service teacher's professional education. In order to maximise opportunities for future teachers to develop their English skills, the teaching and learning of these skills has blended with the utilisation of ICT in many developed and developing countries. The research and the experiences of practitioners suggest that this new educational environment can benefit learning outcomes. This portfolio aimed to support the uptake and improvement of ICT and English in Thailand by exploring English as Foreign Language educational strategies for the Rajabhat Universities in particular and other universities' EFL strategies for pre-service teachers' professional education. This portfolio investigated the role of EFL courses and developed a computer-supported EFL course as a new learning model for EFL curricula and practice. The context is the development of pre-service teachers' professional knowledge and skills in English in Rajabhat Universities in Thailand. To do this, the portfolio firstly examined the existing literature on the history and nature of Thai education, along with the nature and implementation of ICT. The historical and current context of EFL education and training for EFL pre-service teachers in ICT use are examined. A small-scale investigation explored the extent to which the computer-supported EFL training course supports English proficiency. This investigation aimed to identify potential impact on EFL learning of teaching strategies, students' language learning strategies, and attitudes towards learning through computers. Results from the multi-method approach showed that the computer-support EFL training course enhances English learning prepositions. If students with little or no prior experience in multimedia software are able to demonstrate significant improvement in language skills, then it could be expected that such an approach might be viewed as a viable alternative pedagogical approach. The workplace experiences and the engagement of students in such environment and the perspectives of EFL teachers and administrators all support the proposition that interactive multimedia activities which integrate language skills and multi-tasking result in increased motivation to learn and improve learning. This outcome highlights the possible contribution of ICT use in EFL classroom teaching and learning. Teaching and learning strategies and processes coupled with the findings from this portfolio will provide guidance for staff to integrate the ICT in EFL teaching and learning situations, but also to voice and serve the teachers and students' needs in the future development of ICT use in EFL education. English has been taught as a foreign language for over a century, and plays an important role at all levels of the Thai education system. At higher education levels, English skills are essential components of every pre-service teacher's professional education. In order to maximise opportunities for future teachers to develop their English skills, the teaching and learning of these skills has blended with the utilisation of ICT in many developed and developing countries. The research and the experiences of practitioners suggest that this new educational environment can benefit learning outcomes. This portfolio aimed to support the uptake and improvement of ICT and English in Thailand by exploring English as Foreign Language educational strategies for the Rajabhat Universities in particular and other universities' EFL strategies for pre-service teachers' professional education. This portfolio investigated the role of EFL courses and developed a computer-supported EFL course as a new learning model for EFL curricula and practice. The context is the development of pre-service teachers' professional knowledge and skills in English in Rajabhat Universities in Thailand. To do this, the portfolio firstly examined the existing literature on the history and nature of Thai education, along with the nature and implementation of ICT. The historical and current context of EFL education and training for EFL pre-service teachers in ICT use are examined. A small-scale investigation explored the extent to which the computer-supported EFL training course supports English proficiency. This investigation aimed to identify potential impact on EFL learning of teaching strategies, students' language learning strategies, and attitudes towards learning through computers. Results from the multi-method approach showed that the computer-support EFL training course enhances English learning prepositions. If students with little or no prior experience in multimedia software are able to demonstrate significant improvement in language skills, then it could be expected that such an approach might be viewed as a viable alternative pedagogical approach. The workplace experiences and the engagement of students in such environment and the perspectives of EFL teachers and administrators all support the proposition that interactive multimedia activities which integrate language skills and multi-tasking result in increased motivation to learn and improve learning. This outcome highlights the possible contribution of ICT use in EFL classroom teaching and learning. Teaching and learning strategies and processes coupled with the findings from this portfolio will provide guidance for staff to integrate the ICT in EFL teaching and learning situations, but also to voice and serve the teachers and students' needs in the future development of ICT use in EFL education. English has been taught as a foreign language for over a century, and plays an important role at all levels of the Thai education system. At higher education levels, English skills are essential components of every pre-service teacher's professional education. In order to maximise opportunities for future teachers to develop their English skills, the teaching and learning of these skills has blended with the utilisation of ICT in many developed and developing countries. The research and the experiences of practitioners suggest that this new educational environment can benefit learning outcomes. This portfolio aimed to support the uptake and improvement of ICT and English in Thailand by exploring English as Foreign Language educational strategies for the Rajabhat Universities in particular and other universities' EFL strategies for pre-service teachers' professional education. This portfolio investigated the role of EFL courses and developed a computer-supported EFL course as a new learning model for EFL curricula and practice. The context is the development of pre-service teachers' professional knowledge and skills in English in Rajabhat Universities in Thailand. To do this, the portfolio firstly examined the existing literature on the history and nature of Thai education, along with the nature and implementation of ICT. The historical and current context of EFL education and training for EFL pre-service teachers in ICT use are examined. A small-scale investigation explored the extent to which the computer-supported EFL training course supports English proficiency. This investigation aimed to identify potential impact on EFL learning of teaching strategies, students' language learning strategies, and attitudes towards learning through computers. Results from the multi-method approach showed that the computer-support EFL training course enhances English learning prepositions. If students with little or no prior experience in multimedia software are able to demonstrate significant improvement in language skills, then it could be expected that such an approach might be viewed as a viable alternative pedagogical approach. The workplace experiences and the engagement of students in such environment and the perspectives of EFL teachers and administrators all support the proposition that interactive multimedia activities which integrate language skills and multi-tasking result in increased motivation to learn and improve learning. This outcome highlights the possible contribution of ICT use in EFL classroom teaching and learning. Teaching and learning strategies and processes coupled with the findings from this portfolio will provide guidance for staff to integrate the ICT in EFL teaching and learning situations, but also to voice and serve the teachers and students' needs in the future development of ICT use in EFL education. English has been taught as a foreign language for over a century, and plays an important role at all levels of the Thai education system. At higher education levels, English skills are essential components of every pre-service teacher's professional education. In order to maximise opportunities for future teachers to develop their English skills, the teaching and learning of these skills has blended with the utilisation of ICT in many developed and developing countries. The research and the experiences of practitioners suggest that this new educational environment can benefit learning outcomes. This portfolio aimed to support the uptake and improvement of ICT and English in Thailand by exploring English as Foreign Language educational strategies for the Rajabhat Universities in particular and other universities' EFL strategies for pre-service teachers' professional education. This portfolio investigated the role of EFL courses and developed a computer-supported EFL course as a new learning model for EFL curricula and practice. The context is the development of pre-service teachers' professional knowledge and skills in English in Rajabhat Universities in Thailand. To do this, the portfolio firstly examined the existing literature on the history and nature of Thai education, along with the nature and implementation of ICT. The historical and current context of EFL education and training for EFL pre-service teachers in ICT use are examined. A small-scale investigation explored the extent to which the computer-supported EFL training course supports English proficiency. This investigation aimed to identify potential impact on EFL learning of teaching strategies, students' language learning strategies, and attitudes towards learning through computers. Results from the multi-method approach showed that the computer-support EFL training course enhances English learning prepositions. If students with little or no prior experience in multimedia software are able to demonstrate significant improvement in language skills, then it could be expected that such an approach might be viewed as a viable alternative pedagogical approach. The workplace experiences and the engagement of students in such environment and the perspectives of EFL teachers and administrators all support the proposition that interactive multimedia activities which integrate language skills and multi-tasking result in increased motivation to learn and improve learning. This outcome highlights the possible contribution of ICT use in EFL classroom teaching and learning. Teaching and learning strategies and processes coupled with the findings from this portfolio will provide guidance for staff to integrate the ICT in EFL teaching and learning situations, but also to voice and serve the teachers and students' needs in the future development of ICT use in EFL education. English has been taught as a foreign language for over a century, and plays an important role at all levels of the Thai education system. At higher education levels, English skills are essential components of every pre-service teacher's professional education. In order to maximise opportunities for future teachers to develop their English skills, the teaching and learning of these skills has blended with the utilisation of ICT in many developed and developing countries. The research and the experiences of practitioners suggest that this new educational environment can benefit learning outcomes. This portfolio aimed to support the uptake and improvement of ICT and English in Thailand by exploring English as Foreign Language educational strategies for the Rajabhat Universities in particular and other universities' EFL strategies for pre-service teachers' professional education. This portfolio investigated the role of EFL courses and developed a computer-supported EFL course as a new learning model for EFL curricula and practice. The context is the development of pre-service teachers' professional knowledge and skills in English in Rajabhat Universities in Thailand. To do this, the portfolio firstly examined the existing literature on the history and nature of Thai education, along with the nature and implementation of ICT. The historical and current context of EFL education and training for EFL pre-service teachers in ICT use are examined. A small-scale investigation explored the extent to which the computer-supported EFL training course supports English proficiency. This investigation aimed to identify potential impact on EFL learning of teaching strategies, students' language learning strategies, and attitudes towards learning through computers. Results from the multi-method approach showed that the computer-support EFL training course enhances English learning prepositions. If students with little or no prior experience in multimedia software are able to demonstrate significant improvement in language skills, then it could be expected that such an approach might be viewed as a viable alternative pedagogical approach. The workplace experiences and the engagement of students in such environment and the perspectives of EFL teachers and administrators all support the proposition that interactive multimedia activities which integrate language skills and multi-tasking result in increased motivation to learn and improve learning. This outcome highlights the possible contribution of ICT use in EFL classroom teaching and learning. Teaching and learning strategies and processes coupled with the findings from this portfolio will provide guidance for staff to integrate the ICT in EFL teaching and learning situations, but also to voice and serve the teachers and students' needs in the future development of ICT use in EFL education. English has been taught as a foreign language for over a century, and plays an important role at all levels of the Thai education system. At higher education levels, English skills are essential components of every pre-service teacher's professional education. In order to maximise opportunities for future teachers to develop their English skills, the teaching and learning of these skills has blended with the utilisation of ICT in many developed and developing countries. The research and the experiences of practitioners suggest that this new educational environment can benefit learning outcomes. This portfolio aimed to support the uptake and improvement of ICT and English in Thailand by exploring English as Foreign Language educational strategies for the Rajabhat Universities in particular and other universities' EFL strategies for pre-service teachers' professional education. This portfolio investigated the role of EFL courses and developed a computer-supported EFL course as a new learning model for EFL curricula and practice. The context is the development of pre-service teachers' professional knowledge and skills in English in Rajabhat Universities in Thailand. To do this, the portfolio firstly examined the existing literature on the history and nature of Thai education, along with the nature and implementation of ICT. The historical and current context of EFL education and training for EFL pre-service teachers in ICT use are examined. A small-scale investigation explored the extent to which the computer-supported EFL training course supports English proficiency. This investigation aimed to identify potential impact on EFL learning of teaching strategies, students' language learning strategies, and attitudes towards learning through computers. Results from the multi-method approach showed that the computer-support EFL training course enhances English learning prepositions. If students with little or no prior experience in multimedia software are able to demonstrate significant improvement in language skills, then it could be expected that such an approach might be viewed as a viable alternative pedagogical approach. The workplace experiences and the engagement of students in such environment and the perspectives of EFL teachers and administrators all support the proposition that interactive multimedia activities which integrate language skills and multi-tasking result in increased motivation to learn and improve learning. This outcome highlights the possible contribution of ICT use in EFL classroom teaching and learning. Teaching and learning strategies and processes coupled with the findings from this portfolio will provide guidance for staff to integrate the ICT in EFL teaching and learning situations, but also to voice and serve the teachers and students' needs in the future development of ICT use in EFL education. English has been taught as a foreign language for over a century, and plays an important role at all levels of the Thai education system. At higher education levels, English skills are essential components of every pre-service teacher's professional education. In order to maximise opportunities for future teachers to develop their English skills, the teaching and learning of these skills has blended with the utilisation of ICT in many developed and developing countries. The research and the experiences of practitioners suggest that this new educational environment can benefit learning outcomes. This portfolio aimed to support the uptake and improvement of ICT and English in Thailand by exploring English as Foreign Language educational strategies for the Rajabhat Universities in particular and other universities' EFL strategies for pre-service teachers' professional education. This portfolio investigated the role of EFL courses and developed a computer-supported EFL course as a new learning model for EFL curricula and practice. The context is the development of pre-service teachers' professional knowledge and skills in English in Rajabhat Universities in Thailand. To do this, the portfolio firstly examined the existing literature on the history and nature of Thai education, along with the nature and implementation of ICT. The historical and current context of EFL education and training for EFL pre-service teachers in ICT use are examined. A small-scale investigation explored the extent to which the computer-supported EFL training course supports English proficiency. This investigation aimed to identify potential impact on EFL learning of teaching strategies, students' language learning strategies, and attitudes towards learning through computers. Results from the multi-method approach showed that the computer-support EFL training course enhances English learning prepositions. If students with little or no prior experience in multimedia software are able to demonstrate significant improvement in language skills, then it could be expected that such an approach might be viewed as a viable alternative pedagogical approach. The workplace experiences and the engagement of students in such environment and the perspectives of EFL teachers and administrators all support the proposition that interactive multimedia activities which integrate language skills and multi-tasking result in increased motivation to learn and improve learning. This outcome highlights the possible contribution of ICT use in EFL classroom teaching and learning. Teaching and learning strategies and processes coupled with the findings from this portfolio will provide guidance for staff to integrate the ICT in EFL teaching and learning situations, but also to voice and serve the teachers and students' needs in the future development of ICT use in EFL education. English has been taught as a foreign language for over a century, and plays an important role at all levels of the Thai education system. At higher education levels, English skills are essential components of every pre-service teacher's professional education. In order to maximise opportunities for future teachers to develop their English skills, the teaching and learning of these skills has blended with the utilisation of ICT in many developed and developing countries. The research and the experiences of practitioners suggest that this new educational environment can benefit learning outcomes. This portfolio aimed to support the uptake and improvement of ICT and English in Thailand by exploring English as Foreign Language educational strategies for the Rajabhat Universities in particular and other universities' EFL strategies for pre-service teachers' professional education. This portfolio investigated the role of EFL courses and developed a computer-supported EFL course as a new learning model for EFL curricula and practice. The context is the development of pre-service teachers' professional knowledge and skills in English in Rajabhat Universities in Thailand. To do this, the portfolio firstly examined the existing literature on the history and nature of Thai education, along with the nature and implementation of ICT. The historical and current context of EFL education and training for EFL pre-service teachers in ICT use are examined. A small-scale investigation explored the extent to which the computer-supported EFL training course supports English proficiency. This investigation aimed to identify potential impact on EFL learning of teaching strategies, students' language learning strategies, and attitudes towards learning through computers. Results from the multi-method approach showed that the computer-support EFL training course enhances English learning prepositions. If students with little or no prior experience in multimedia software are able to demonstrate significant improvement in language skills, then it could be expected that such an approach might be viewed as a viable alternative pedagogical approach. The workplace experiences and the engagement of students in such environment and the perspectives of EFL teachers and administrators all support the proposition that interactive multimedia activities which integrate language skills and multi-tasking result in increased motivation to learn and improve learning. This outcome highlights the possible contribution of ICT use in EFL classroom teaching and learning. Teaching and learning strategies and processes coupled with the findings from this portfolio will provide guidance for staff to integrate the ICT in EFL teaching and learning situations, but also to voice and serve the teachers and students' needs in the future development of ICT use in EFL education. English has been taught as a foreign language for over a century, and plays an important role at all levels of the Thai education system. At higher education levels, English skills are essential components of every pre-service teacher's professional education. In order to maximise opportunities for future teachers to develop their English skills, the teaching and learning of these skills has blended with the utilisation of ICT in many developed and developing countries. The research and the experiences of practitioners suggest that this new educational environment can benefit learning outcomes. This portfolio aimed to support the uptake and improvement of ICT and English in Thailand by exploring English as Foreign Language educational strategies for the Rajabhat Universities in particular and other universities' EFL strategies for pre-service teachers' professional education. This portfolio investigated the role of EFL courses and developed a computer-supported EFL course as a new learning model for EFL curricula and practice. The context is the development of pre-service teachers' professional knowledge and skills in English in Rajabhat Universities in Thailand. To do this, the portfolio firstly examined the existing literature on the history and nature of Thai education, along with the nature and implementation of ICT. The historical and current context of EFL education and training for EFL pre-service teachers in ICT use are examined. A small-scale investigation explored the extent to which the computer-supported EFL training course supports English proficiency. This investigation aimed to identify potential impact on EFL learning of teaching strategies, students' language learning strategies, and attitudes towards learning through computers. Results from the multi-method approach showed that the computer-support EFL training course enhances English learning prepositions. If students with little or no prior experience in multimedia software are able to demonstrate significant improvement in language skills, then it could be expected that such an approach might be viewed as a viable alternative pedagogical approach. The workplace experiences and the engagement of students in such environment and the perspectives of EFL teachers and administrators all support the proposition that interactive multimedia activities which integrate language skills and multi-tasking result in increased motivation to learn and improve learning. This outcome highlights the possible contribution of ICT use in EFL classroom teaching and learning. Teaching and learning strategies and processes coupled with the findings from this portfolio will provide guidance for staff to integrate the ICT in EFL teaching and learning situations, but also to voice and serve the teachers and students' needs in the future development of ICT use in EFL education. English has been taught as a foreign language for over a century, and plays an important role at all levels of the Thai education system. At higher education levels, English skills are essential components of every pre-service teacher's professional education. In order to maximise opportunities for future teachers to develop their English skills, the teaching and learning of these skills has blended with the utilisation of ICT in many developed and developing countries. The research and the experiences of practitioners suggest that this new educational environment can benefit learning outcomes. This portfolio aimed to support the uptake and improvement of ICT and English in Thailand by exploring English as Foreign Language educational strategies for the Rajabhat Universities in particular and other universities' EFL strategies for pre-service teachers' professional education. This portfolio investigated the role of EFL courses and developed a computer-supported EFL course as a new learning model for EFL curricula and practice. The context is the development of pre-service teachers' professional knowledge and skills in English in Rajabhat Universities in Thailand. To do this, the portfolio firstly examined the existing literature on the history and nature of Thai education, along with the nature and implementation of ICT. The historical and current context of EFL education and training for EFL pre-service teachers in ICT use are examined. A small-scale investigation explored the extent to which the computer-supported EFL training course supports English proficiency. This investigation aimed to identify potential impact on EFL learning of teaching strategies, students' language learning strategies, and attitudes towards learning through computers. Results from the multi-method approach showed that the computer-support EFL training course enhances English learning prepositions. If students with little or no prior experience in multimedia software are able to demonstrate significant improvement in language skills, then it could be expected that such an approach might be viewed as a viable alternative pedagogical approach. The workplace experiences and the engagement of students in such environment and the perspectives of EFL teachers and administrators all support the proposition that interactive multimedia activities which integrate language skills and multi-tasking result in increased motivation to learn and improve learning. This outcome highlights the possible contribution of ICT use in EFL classroom teaching and learning. Teaching and learning strategies and processes coupled with the findings from this portfolio will provide guidance for staff to integrate the ICT in EFL teaching and learning situations, but also to voice and serve the teachers and students' needs in the future development of ICT use in EFL education.

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