Title

Factors influencing school staff's implementation of a pastoral care program designed to reduce students' harm from tobacco and other drugs

Date of Award

2012

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Public Health

School

School of Exercise and Health Science

Faculty

Computing, Health and Science

First Advisor

Professor Donna Cross

Second Advisor

Dr Laura Thomas

Third Advisor

Dr Margaret Hall

Abstract

Tobacco, along with alcohol, is one of the most commonly used drugs in Australia. Although trends in adolescent smoking have decreased, it has been estimated that worldwide, 80,000 to 100,000 youth take up smoking every day. Hence, adolescent tobacco use is still an important public health issue.

To measure the success of a school-based program that reduces harm from tobacco and other drugs, the effective implementation of the program is essential. Although school staff may recognise the value and importance of an intervention, inadequate implementation by these staff is a common occurrence in intervention research projects.

This Masters study aimed to investigate the factors influencing school staff’s implementation of a pastoral care program designed to reduce students’ harm from tobacco and other drugs. The five research questions for this study were:

1. What are the external environmental factors that influence school staff’s implementation of the KIT-Plus Research Project intervention?

2. What are the school-level factors that influence school staff’s implementation of the KIT-Plus Research Project intervention?

3. What are the individual staff-level factors that influence school staff’s implementation of the KIT-Plus Research Project intervention?

4. What are the intervention factors that influence school staff’s implementation of the KIT-Plus Research Project intervention?

5. How have the external environmental, school, individual and intervention factors contributed to each school’s mean level of implementation of the KIT-Plus Research Project intervention?

This project was conducted as part of a Healthway funded Tobacco Control Research Development Program administered by Edith Cowan University’s Child Health Promotion Research Centre (CHPRC). This Masters project also contributed to the Healthway funded longitudinal study, the Keeping In Touch (KIT) - Plus Research Project (2008 – 2010) conducted in collaboration with School Drug Education and Road Aware (SDERA).

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Access to this thesis - the full text is restricted to current ECU staff and students only. Email request to library@ecu.edu.au

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