Date of Award

1-1-1997

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Education

Faculty

Faculty of Education

First Advisor

Tony Monk

Abstract

The problem under investigation is concerned with the teaching of drawing through distance education. Traditionally drawing has occupied a central position in visual art teaching and learning and is still regarded as a significant area of visual arts education. In the visual arts curriculum of Western Australia, drawing, which is included in the broader term visual inquiry, is regarded as the foundation for studio practice. It is therefore appropriate to include drawing as part of every visual arts teaching program. The correspondence mode of teaching, which has a text-base, is a more formal style of teaching art than the responsive teaching that normally occurs in an art class. Through distance education it is difficult to encourage drawing skills either through remediation or extension without creating a burden of extra work for the students. This is due to the design of the course booklets in projects which schedule the drawing lesson as one of many the student is required to complete in a semester. The projects culminate in a final studio product, thus emphasising that drawing remains a step towards the product.

Included in

Art Education Commons

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