Date of Award

2006

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Arts Honours

School

School of Psychology and Social Sciences

Faculty

Faculty of Computing, Health and Science

First Advisor

Dr Kevin Runions

Abstract

Ethnic minorities can suffer detrimental health consequences as a result of their experiences with racial discrimination. A strong ethnic identity may buffer the impact of racial discrimination for the members of ethnic minority groups. The current paper reviews research on the negative health consequences associated with perceived racial discrimination. It presents research to support the notion of a strong ethnic identity providing a protective effect on the health status of ethnic minorities. Inconsistencies and limitations of the various studies are discussed. Abundant throughout the literature on this topic is correlational research design and experimental design is scarce; reasons behind this are discussed. The paper concludes with recommendations for future research. The present study explored the issues of the negative health consequences associated with perceived discrimination and the possible benefits of a strong ethnic identity in children from Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CaLD) backgrounds. A total of30 children aged between 7 and 15 years from 26 families of Asian or Middle-Eastern backgrounds participated. The children completed a questionnaire booklet which included adaptations of the Multigroup Ethnic Identity Measure (MEIM), The Experiences of Racism Scale and The Everyday Experiences of Discrimination scale. The parents completed The Social Behaviour Questionnaire. The results did not support prior research and the study's hypotheses were not significant (p > .05). Recommendations for future research are considered in light of issues that arose throughout the study.

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