Date of Award

2008

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Social Sciences Honours

School

School of Psychology and Social Sciences

Faculty

Faculty of Computing, Health and Science

First Advisor

Margaret Sims

Abstract

The early years of children's lives are vitally important to their long term outcomes. Yet, in Australian, not all children have access to the same opportunities to enhance their development and achieve their fullest potential, as Australian Indigenous children experience considerable disadvantage in comparison to other Australian children. The multifaceted approach required to eliminate this disadvantage, and the associated oppression, has education central to it. Emancipatory education is powerful as it assists learners to develop skills and, within the context of the educational philosopher Freire, also develop their ability to confront their oppression. This research paper explores Indigenous child care training developed in Western Australia and Canada's successful model of working with Indigenous Canadians, First Nations, in the child care and education area. This exploration is conducted within Freire's approach to education to determine what makes education liberating for oppressed groups and ameliorates disadvantage.

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