Date of Award

2008

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Communications Honours

School

School of Communications and Contemporary Art

Faculty

Faculty of Education & Arts

First Advisor

Dr Guan Cheng Quek

Abstract

This study investigates how an integrated marketing communications (IMC) strategy could be adopted or adapted for an effective regional promotional campaign of a State Government office. As in-depth understanding of the process of adoption or adaptation of IMC was needed, qualitative research methodology was used. The study utilised Foucault's concepts of discourse, knowledge and power to develop the knowledge-practice-recommended practice framework In this study, five one-to-one structured interviews were conducted with IMC practitioners who had previous experience in IMC and State Government regional promotional campaigns, and were residents of the State where they practised IMC. Using the knowledge part of the framework the study found that the theoretical knowledge of IMC practitioners was based on theoretical holism. Using the practice part of the framework the study found that the previous practice of participants from the context of marketing situations was based on pragmatic holism. Using the recommended practice part of the framework the study found that recommended practices of participants based on the context of the regional brief was based on involvement holism. Collated, these key findings showed that the knowledge, practice and recommended practice of participants were based on theoretic holism, pragmatic holism, and involvement holism. Thus, the model of holistic involvement describes how an IMC strategy can be adopted or adapted for an effective regional promotional campaign of a State Government office. These findings are significant as they will enhance the theoretical rigour of the IMC discipline and offer a theoretical model for other IMC researchers to use when investigating the IMC discipline. The theoretical model will also assist IMC practitioners to develop a model to adapt or adopt IMC. The implications of the findings suggest change to IMC policies and practices of the State Government office. These are presented in the study as a set of guidelines for implementing IMC. There are three benefits from this study. Firstly, this research provides IMC practitioners of the State an opportunity to voice opinions regarding an IMC campaign by a State Government office. Secondly, this research contributes to the body of knowledge with the development of the model of holistic involvement. Thirdly, it provides a foundation for public IMC campaigns targeting regional areas. These benefits are of great importance to both the IMC discipline and State Government offices.

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