Date of Award

2008

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Science Honours

School

School of Exercise, Biomedical and Health Sciences

Faculty

Faculty of Computing, Health and Science

First Advisor

Dr Michael McGuigan

Second Advisor

Dr Michael Newton

Abstract

The purpose of the study was to investigate the relationship between session rate of perceived exertion (RPE) measures and the volume load (VL) during resistance training (RT). Twelve male and eight female participants (24.3 ± 4.2 years) performed three RT sessions per week for a period of four weeks. The RT sessions during the week consisted of strength, hypertrophy and power protocols that included the same four resistance exercises (bench press, squat, shoulder press and bench row). The participants performed 3 sets of 3 repetitions per exercise at a load of 75-90% of their 1-RM with a rest period of five minutes between each set for the strength sessions, 3 sets of 10 repetitions per exercise at a load of 65-75% of their 1-RM with a one minute rest period between each set for the hypertrophy sessions and 3 sets of 5 repetitions per exercise at a load of 25-40% of their 1-RM at a fast lifting speed with a three minute rest period, for the power sessions. Session RPE was collected within thirty minutes following the completion of each session using the Borg's CR-10 RPE scale. Session load (SL), monotony and strain were derived from the session RPE values. The training volume for each session was determined by calculating VL (total repetitions and amount of weight lifted). Pearson's product moment correlations revealed significant relationships between VL and session RPE (r = 0.737), as well as VL and SL (r = 0.258). However, there were no significant relationships between the average weekly VL and training monotony, and average weekly VL and training strain. There were significant differences between the strength, hypertrophy and power protocols for session RPE, SL and session duration. It was concluded that the session RPE method is a simple way of monitoring VL during undulated periodised RT program. It was also demonstrated that the SL did not provide the same information as volume load during RT possibly due to the dependence on session duration.

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