Date of Award

1990

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Social Science (Hons.)

School

School of Community and Language Studies

Faculty

Western Australian College of Advanced Education

First Advisor

Dr Hyung Shik Kim

Abstract

The study was designed to investigate if, the community transport providers operating within a local authority were able to meet the daily requests for transport to the frail aged and disabled persons living in this locality. Then to ascertain if these transport providers were fully utilising their transport vehicles, which could be volunteers in cars, or a small bus. If they were able to meet these demands, would they be interested in sharing their vehicles by becoming part of an integrated community transport service? The data collection techniques consisted of firstly conducting a qualitative meta-analysis on a selection of community transport articles from overseas, the eastern states of Australia and from local, Western Australian, studies. The second part involved a conducted interview with the transport providers using a standardised interview as the instrument. The major findings of the data analysis showed that volunteers using their own cars provide 69% of this service. In addition, 69% of the (N=26) transport providers were able to meet the daily demands on their services, 19.% are willing to share their vehicles and 65% of the providers are interested in becoming part of an integrated community transport service. Due to the lack of available resources, drivers, and funding, 35% of service providers are unable to meet the daily client demands. The major conclusion of the study is that of the 54% of providers who own their bus(es), only 12% are willing to share their vehicles for integration purposes and 4% will share, but not integrate, until an assurance is made on the compensation for the wear and tear to their bus. The meta-analysis and the findings indicate a small localised integration scheme is possible.

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