Date of Award

1996

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Science Honours

Faculty

Faculty of Science, Technology and Engineering

First Advisor

Dr Mark Lund

Abstract

Australia has no native cyprinid species and five introduced species have established self-sustaining populations. This study examines the cyprinid species present in Western Australia and estimates their distribution. The potential for introduced cyprinids to cause environmental impacts is explained and ameliorative action recommended. The presence and distribution of cyprinid species is assessed by examination of museum records, published literature, reported collections, anecdotal evidence and sampling of wetland habitats. Two species, Carassius nuratus (Goldfish) and Cyprinus carpio (Koi carp) are believed to have established populations and a map of estimated distribution is compiled. The capacity for introduced carp to undergo sudden population explosions, long after initial introduction, has been clearly displayed in New Zealand and in the eastern states of Australia. Carp's unique biological and morphological characteristics are examined and the capacity for these characteristics to lead to wider dispersal and environmental impacts in Western Australian wetlands is assessed. The assessment is supplemented by a literature review and a compiled bibliography of published Australian research literature. Principles of effective management of cyprinid populations are discussed and recommendations for amelioration of potential impacts is provided. This is a preliminary study and suggests further avenues of essential research.

Share

 
COinS