Title

Work-life balance and fly-in/fly-out mining : a qualitative study on FIFO employee perceptions of work-life balance in the mining industry

Date of Award

2011

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Business (Honours)

School

School of Management

Faculty

Business and Law

First Advisor

Tara Smith

Second Advisor

Rowena Barrett

Abstract

Through the adoption of semi-structured email interviews, this study explores the perceptions of job and life satisfaction that fly-in/fly-out (FIFO) mining employees have towards work-life balance (WLB). A sample of eight FIFO employees within similar West Australian (WA) mining operations volunteered to participate in the study. Using a conceptual framework developed for this study areas explored include, amongst others, the financial benefits of FIFO working, experiences of the working environment and employee wellbeing. Age, gender and martial status are used as moderating variables to illustrate differences in responses to questions. The findings reveal various issues that influence FIFO employee perceptions of WLB that impact on their job and life satisfaction. There are a number of benefits and limitations workers perceive as being associated with FIFO working but the majority of those interviewed suggest that the benefits outweigh the limitations. FIFO working is attractive for the lucrative pay received which is used to support and provide a higher standard of living for workers and their families. The findings are discussed in relation to the literature reviewed, with some results challenging earlier researchers findings while partially supporting the findings of others in regards to the impact FIFO working has on job and life satisfaction. The strengths and limitations of the study are highlighted as well as a number of potential avenues for future research of a similar nature being presented.

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Access to this thesis - the full text is restricted to current ECU staff and students by author's request. Email request to library@ecu.edu.au

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