Date of Award

1996

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Education Honours

Faculty

Faculty of Education

First Advisor

Rob Ellis

Abstract

This study focused on student's attitude to using the Internet at school. A questionnaire (the School Internet Attitude questionnaire) measuring student attitude to using the Internet at school incorporating three dimensions (cognitive, behavioural and affective) was administered twice to a sample of 64 Year 12 students from a Perth Metropolitan Independent school. The questionnaire was administered before and after a six lesson 'exposure' (the limited classroom exposure) to the Internet. Pre and post test attitude measures of all students were compared using dependent sample t_ test to determine if there were significant differences in student's attitude after the limited classroom exposure to using the Internet at school and for each of the three dimensions of the School Internet Attitude questionnaire. Within the sample, the attitudes of current regular users of the Internet (students who use the Internet at least a few times a week) and current non-regular users of the Internet (students who have never used the Internet or use the Internet less than a few times a week) were compared before and again after the limited classroom exposure. A MANOV A design was used to measure the student's attitude to using the Internet at school, the dependent variables were the cognitive, behavioural and affective dimensions of the School Internet Attitude questionnaire, with repeated measures on the independent variable, level of current use of the Internet. The study found that the limited classroom exposure caused no significant change in the student's attitude to using the Internet at school from the pretest to the post test nor was there a significant change in attitude in any of the three dimensions, cognitive, behavioural and affective of the School Internet Attitude questionnaire. However, there was a significant difference in the attitude to using the Internet at school of regular and non-regular Internet users in the pretest with the cognitive and affective dimension showing significant differences and in the post test with the cognitive, behavioural and affective dimensions showing significant differences. Regular Internet users showed a more positive attitude than non-regular Internet users to using the Internet at school in both the pretest and the post test and for all three of the dependent variables the cognitive, behavioural and affective dimensions of the School Internet Attitude questionnaire.

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