Date of Award

1996

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Education Honours

School

School of Education

Faculty

Faculty of Education

First Advisor

Tarquam McKenna

Abstract

This thesis investigated the effect of the teaching strategy of role play on Year 9 students' creative writing and attitudes towards creative writing in the English classroom. The aim of the research was to compare role play, as a student-centred strategy, with the more commonly used strategies in the teaching of writing in the secondary English classroom, and explore and measure the effects. An experiment was conducted with a class of 32 students of average to above average abilities, divided into two groups: one was taught creative writing through role play while the other group was taught by a variety of traditional teaching strategies. The research design incorporated a pre-test - intervention – post-test design with the creative writing programme being the intervention. A mixed-method approach was used to obtain quantitative and qualitative results. Two main self-designed instruments measured the quantitative results: (1) prose-text - measuring the creative writing achievement and attitudes (2) questionnaire - measuring attitudes. The findings were (1) the role play students performed significantly better than the traditional students in creative writing achievements (2) the role play students had more positive attitudes towards creative writing as measured by the prose text instrument; however the other findings showed no significant difference.

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