Title

The hyperhydration potential of sodium bicarbonate and sodium citrate

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism

Volume

32

Issue

2

First Page

74

Last Page

81

PubMed ID

34875625

Publisher

Human Kinetics

School

School of Medical and Health Sciences

Funders

Deakin University, Australian Catholic University

Comments

Siegler, J. C., Carr, A. J., Jardine, W. T., Convit, L., Cross, R., Chapman, D., ... & Ross, M. (2022). The Hyperhydration Potential of Sodium Bicarbonate and Sodium Citrate. International journal of sport nutrition and exercise metabolism, 32, p. 74-81. https://doi.org/10.1123/ijsnem.2021-0179

Abstract

Buffering agents have not been comprehensively profiled in terms of their capacity to influence water retention prior to exercise. The purpose of this investigation was to profile the fluid retention characteristics of sodium bicarbonate (BIC) and sodium citrate (CIT) to determine the efficacy of these buffering mediums as hyperhydrating agents. Nineteen volunteers (13 males and six females; age = 28.3 ± 4.9 years) completed three trials (randomized and cross-over design). For each trial, a baseline measurement of body mass, capillary blood, and urine was collected prior to ingestion of their respective condition (control condition [CON] = 25 ml/kg artificially sweetened water; BIC condition = CON + 7.5 g/L of sodium in the form of BIC; CIT condition = CON + 7.5 g/L of sodium in the form of CIT). The fluid loads were consumed in four equal aliquots (0, 20, 40 and 60 min; fluid intake was 1.972 ± 361 ml [CON]; 1.977 ± 360 ml [BIC]; 1.953 ± 352 ml [CIT]). Samples were recorded at 20 (body mass and urine) and 60 min (blood) intervals for 180 min. Blood buffering capacity (HCO3−) was elevated (p < .001) in both BIC (32.1 ± 2.2 mmol/L) and CIT (28.9 ± 3.8 mmol/L) at 180 min compared with CON (25.1 ± 1.8 mmol/L). Plasma volume expansion was greater (p < .001) in both BIC (8.1 ± 1.3%) and CIT (5.9 ± 1.8%) compared with CON (−1.1 ± 1.4%); whereas, total urine production was lower in BIC and CIT at 180 min (BIC vs. CON, mean difference of 370 ± 85 ml; p < .001; CIT vs. CON, mean difference of 239 ± 102 ml; p = .05). There were no increases observed in body mass (p = .9). Under resting conditions, these data suggest BIC and CIT induce a greater plasma hypervolemic response as compared with water alone.

DOI

10.1123/ijsnem.2021-0179

Access Rights

free_to_read

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