Title

Developing person-centred goal setting resources with and for people with aphasia: A multi-phase qualitative study

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Aphasiology

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

School

School of Medical and Health Sciences

RAS ID

35954

Funders

National Health and Medical Research Council Centre for Research Excellence Stroke Rehabilitation and Recovery National Heart Foundation of Australia Centre for Research Excellence

Grant Number

NHMRC Number : 1154273, 1072053

Grant Link

http://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1072053

Comments

Elston, A., Barnden, R., Hersh, D., Godecke, E., Cadilhac, D. A., Lannin, N. A., ... Andrew, N. E. (2022). Developing person-centred goal setting resources with and for people with aphasia: A multi-phase qualitative study. Aphasiology, 36(7), 761-780. https://doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2021.1907294

Abstract

Introduction: Stroke patients with aphasia are often excluded from person-centred goal setting as part of their clinical care, despite a recommendation for person-centred goal setting in national clinical guidelines. Aim: To develop and field test an aphasia supplement to a person-centred goal setting package for stroke to better meet the needs of patients with aphasia. Methods: A multi-phase, qualitative study design was employed building on prior work in a non-aphasia stroke population. Initial materials, including clinician training, were developed into an aphasia goal setting supplement with input from an expert working group. In phase one, feedback was sought from consumers with aphasia (n=5) on the layout and format of the patient-facing components. In phase two, six clinicians from one Australian healthcare network (occupational therapy: n=2, physiotherapy: n=1 and speech pathology: n=3) were observed using the goal setting package with eight inpatients with aphasia (2 mild, 3 moderate, 3 severe). In phase three, post field testing feedback was sought from clinicians (n=5) and patients with aphasia (n=3). Content analysis of interview data was carried out. Results: The consumer feedback session in phase one indicated that the supplement layout was helpful for including people with aphasia to participate actively in person-centred goal setting. Adaptations were made for the aphasia supplement including language, graphic, and format changes based on the feedback. During the field testing in phase two, 18 person-centred goals were set with eight patients with aphasia (median two goals) and included: secondary prevention (8%), functional recovery (31%), community participation (28%), everyday activities (28%), and environment (6%). Based on observations by members of the research team during field testing, clinicians across the multidisciplinary team were able to facilitate goal setting effectively. In phase three, clinicians and patients reported the supplement was useful to facilitate person-centred goal setting for people with aphasia. Conclusion: The aphasia supplement for the goal setting package was appropriate in meeting the needs of patients with aphasia after stroke and encouraged person-centred goal setting across multiple recovery areas. Conclusion: The aphasia supplement for the goal setting package was appropriate in meeting the needs of patients with aphasia after stroke and encouraged person-centred goal setting across multiple recovery areas.

DOI

10.1080/02687038.2021.1907294

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