Title

Australian Aboriginal English and links with culture

Document Type

Book Chapter

Publisher

Wiley

Place of Publication

USA

RAS ID

26246

Comments

Originally published as: Malcolm, I. G. (2018). Australian Aboriginal English and Links With Culture. In The TESOL Encyclopedia of English Language Teaching (eds J. I. Liontas, T. International Association and M. DelliCarpini). Original article available here

Abstract

Indigenous Australians once spoke up to 300 languages but today, for the most part, speak varieties of Aboriginal English and/or creole. Aboriginal English is a post‐pidgin/post‐creole dialect, distinct from Australian English in phonology, grammar, lexicon, and semantics and showing both formal and conceptual continuity with Indigenous languages as well as with pidgin and creole. The TESOL profession in Australia recognizes that, for speakers of Aboriginal English in the context of an education system based on Standard Australian English (SAE), a bidialectal (English as an Additional Dialect) approach needs to be taken, drawing on linguistic and cultural resources from both Indigenous and mainstream speech communities.

DOI

10.1002/9781118784235.eelt0306

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