Title

Cognitive processes in chess

Document Type

Book Chapter

Publisher

Routledge

Place of Publication

New York, USA

School

School of Arts and Humanities

RAS ID

26177

Comments

Originally published as: Campitelli, G. (2017). Cognitive processes in chess. In Hambrick, D., Campitelli, G., & Macnamara, B. (Eds.), The science of expertise: Behavioral, neural, and genetic approaches to complex skill (pp. 31-46). New York, NY: Routledge. Original article available here

Abstract

In November 2016 two chess prodigies will play the World Chess Championship match in New York. The world champion Magnus Carlsen (Norwegian, 25 years old) will face the challenger Sergey Karjakin (Ukraine-born Russian, 26 years old). Carlsen obtained the international grandmaster (GM) title[1] at the age of 13, he was the youngest player to reach the Number 1 in the world ranking at the age of 19, obtained the highest chess rating[2] in the history of chess at the age of 22, and became world champion in the same year. Karjakin was the youngest player to obtain the international master (IM) title just before turning 12, and the GM title at the age of 12 years and 7 months. (He still holds both records). Chess is a discipline with all the ideal ingredients to study cognitive processes and expertise.

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