Title

Awareness, acceptability and access to screening mammography for remote Aboriginal women

Document Type

Letter to the Editor

Publisher

John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

School

School of Nursing and Midwifery

RAS ID

27794

Comments

Originally published as:

Byers, L., Michell, K., & McCullough, K. (2018). Awareness, acceptability and access to screening mammography for remote Aboriginal women. Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 29(3), 366-367.

Original article available here.

Abstract

Aboriginal women experience higher mortality rates from breast cancer than non‐Aboriginal women. Access to screening mammography for remote Aboriginal women is limited due to transport and accommodation costs, fewer services and cultural factors. In an attempt to address these barriers, a mobile screening mammography service commenced across remote Northern Territory communities. The mobile service adopted a hub and spoke model, operating out of larger remote communities and inviting participation from smaller, more remote communities within the geographical hub. The fragility of the screening equipment limited the number of potential hub locations in very remote areas where access is via unsealed roads. Cost of travel to hub communities remained the responsibility of the women, rather than funded through routine health services. Poverty, distance, poor road conditions and few transport options remained significant barriers for many women in accessing screening mammography.

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DOI

10.1002/hpja.40

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