Title

Family Group Conferencing as a catalyst for recovery and ownership in mental health

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Psychiatry

Medical Subject Headings

Adult; Community Mental Health Services; Family; Friends; Humans; Male; Mental Disorders; Middle Aged; Netherlands; Ownership; Qualitative Research; Social Support

ISSN

1943-281X

Volume

81

Issue

2

First Page

101

Last Page

115

PubMed ID

30199332

Publisher

Taylor and Francis

School

School of Nursing and Midwifery / Centre for Nursing, Midwifery and Health Services Research

RAS ID

27581

Grant Link

Funding information available at: https://doi.org/10.1080/00332747.2018.1492850

Comments

Originally published as: de Jong, G., Meijer, E., & Schout, G. (2018). Family Group Conferencing as a catalyst for recovery and ownership in mental health. Psychiatry, 81(2), 101-115. Original publication available here

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Recovery is a journey not only of personal change but also of social reengagement. It underlines the essence of social environments that are supportive to the recovery of people with ongoing mental health issues. The process of recovery also affects other actors, and likewise these actors exert their influence on the recovery of their family member or friend.

OBJECTIVE: Since 2009, we have been studying whether the decision-making model called family group conferencing (FGC) helps mental health clients increase their self-reliance. The essence of FGC is that individuals who experience problems have the opportunity to develop a plan together with people from their social network. Clients in mental health have to deal with different forms of disempowerment, especially when they are threatened with compulsory measures. It is an aim to help them regain ownership over their problems as well as over the potential solutions.

METHOD: From 2011 to 2013, we evaluated 41 family group conferences that were organized for clients in a public mental health care setting in the north of the Netherlands. Each conference was analyzed in a qualitative case study framework.

RESULTS: This article highlights two case portraits. It gives insight into how ownership was restored and what this meant regarding clients' recovery process.

CONCLUSION: FGC seems a promising tool to shift the attention from disorders and inabilities to capacities and the rediscovery of social resources.

DOI

10.1080/00332747.2018.1492850

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