Title

Isolated ingestion of caffeine and sodium bicarbonate on repeated sprint performance: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport

ISSN

1878-1861

Volume

22

Issue

8

First Page

962

Last Page

972

PubMed ID

31036532

Publisher

Elsevier Ltd

School

Centre for Exercise and Sports Science Research / School of Medical and Health Sciences

RAS ID

28705

Funders

Funding information available at: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsams.2019.03.007

Comments

Originally published as: Lopes-Silva, J. P., Choo, H. C., Franchini, E., & Abbiss, C. R. (2019). Isolated ingestion of caffeine and sodium bicarbonate on repeated sprint performance: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 22, 962-972. Original publication available here

Abstract

Objectives

This study is a systematic review and meta-analysis aimed at investigating the isolated effects of caffeine and sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) ingestion on repeated sprint ability (RSA).

Methods

Following a search through PubMed and Scopus, 13 studies (7 with caffeine and 6 with NaHCO3) were found to meet inclusion criteria. Random-effects of standardized mean difference (SMD) for total work and best sprint performance was examined. Study quality was assessed using QualSyst.

Results

The meta-analysis indicated that caffeine ingestion did not improve the total work done (weighted average effect size Hedges’s g = −0.01, 95%CI: −0.32 to 0.31, p = 0.97), best sprint (weighted average effect size Hedges’s g = −0.02, 95% CI: −0.32 to 0.27; p = 0.87) or last sprint performance (weighed average effect size Hedge’s g = −0.27, 95%CI: −0.68 to 0.14; p = 0.20), when compared with a placebo condition. Similarly, NaHCO3 ingestion did not improve the total work done (weighted average effect size Hedges’s g = 0.43, 95% CI: −0.11 to 0.97, p = 0.12), best sprint (weighted average effect size Hedges’s g = 0.02, 95% CI −0.30 to 0.34; p = 0.90) or last sprint performance (weighted average effect size Hedge’s g = 0.20, 95%CI: −0.13 to 0.52, p = 0.14), compared with a placebo condition. Quality assessment of selected articles was classified as strong.

Conclusion

This meta-analysis provides evidence that repeated sprint ability is not affected by acute ingestion of caffeine or NaHCO3.

DOI

10.1016/j.jsams.2019.03.007

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