Title

The impact of a rolling start on the sprint velocity and acceleration kinematics of a quick single in regional first grade cricketers

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

International Journal of Performance Analysis in Sport

Publisher

Taylor and Francis

School

School of Medical and Health Sciences

RAS ID

25265

Comments

Originally published as: Callaghan, J. S., Jeffriess, D. M., Mackie, L. S., Jalilvand, F., & Lockie, G. R. (2015). The impact of a rolling start on the sprint velocity and acceleration kinematics of a quick single in regional first grade cricketers. International Journal of Performance Analysis in Sport, 15(3), 794-808. Original publication available here

Abstract

Cricket batsmen will typically use a rolling start where they walk and drag the bat past the crease before attempting a quick single. Although part of coaching practice, the impact of the rolling start has not been clearly documented. This study investigated the impact of using a static or rolling start prior to a quick single in cricketers. Fourteen Australian regional first grade cricketers completed three quick single sprints with a static start, and three with a rolling start. 0-5, 0-10, and 0-17.68 metre velocities were measured. First and second step kinematics were recorded by a motion analysis system. Paired t-tests (p < 0.05) compared the start conditions; effect sizes were also calculated. The rolling start resulted in faster velocities (p < 0.01 with large effects) over each interval. The velocity difference between the start conditions was approximately half a metre per second over all the intervals. The rolling start resulted in longer first and second steps, higher second step frequency, narrower second step width, and lower second step contact time. A rolling start will lead to a faster quick single, and step kinematics reflective of this. Cricketers should be cognizant of the velocity decreases associated with a static start.

DOI

10.1080/24748668.2015.11868831

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