Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

New Phytologist

ISSN

1469-8137

Volume

224

Issue

3

First Page

1108

Last Page

1120

PubMed ID

31291691

Publisher

Wiley

School

School of Science

RAS ID

29997

Funders

Research and postdoctoral fellowships to MP and DLF were funded by a Discovery Grant from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada to SCHB. GP received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Skłodowska-Curie Grant Agreement no. 665385.

Comments

Originally published as: Puixeu, G., Pickup, M., Field, D. L., & Barrett, S. C. H. (2019). Variation in sexual dimorphism in a wind‐pollinated plant: The influence of geographical context and life‐cycle dynamics. New Phytologist, 224(3), 1108-1120.

Original article available here.

Abstract

Understanding the mechanisms causing phenotypic differences between females and males has long fascinated evolutionary biologists. An extensive literature exists on animal sexual dimorphism but less information is known about sex differences in plants, particularly the extent of geographical variation in sexual dimorphism and its life‐cycle dynamics.

Here, we investigated patterns of genetically based sexual dimorphism in vegetative and reproductive traits of a wind‐pollinated dioecious plant, Rumex hastatulus, across three life‐cycle stages using open‐pollinated families from 30 populations spanning the geographic range and chromosomal variation (XY and XY1Y2) of the species.

The direction and degree of sexual dimorphism was highly variable among populations and life‐cycle stages. Sex‐specific differences in reproductive function explained a significant amount of temporal change in sexual dimorphism. For several traits, geographical variation in sexual dimorphism was associated with bioclimatic parameters, likely due to the differential responses of the sexes to climate. We found no systematic differences in sexual dimorphism between chromosome races.

Sex‐specific trait differences in dioecious plants largely result from a balance between sexual and natural selection on resource allocation. Our results indicate that abiotic factors associated with geographical context also play a role in modifying sexual dimorphism during the plant life‐cycle.

DOI

10.1111/nph.16050

Access Rights

free_to_read

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Included in

Life Sciences Commons

Share

 
COinS