Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Disability and Rehabilitation

Publisher

Taylor and Francis

School

School of Medical and Health Sciences

RAS ID

31823

Comments

Rohde, A., Doi, S. A., Worrall, L., Godecke, E., Farrell, A., O’Halloran, R., ... & Wong, A. (2020). Development and diagnostic validation of the Brisbane Evidence-Based Language Test. Disability and rehabilitation, Advanced online publication. https://doi.org/10.1080/09638288.2020.1773547

Abstract

Purpose: To describe the development and determine the diagnostic accuracy of the Brisbane Evidence-Based Language Test in detecting aphasia. Methods: Consecutive acute stroke admissions (n = 100; mean = 66.49y) participated in a single (assessor) blinded cross-sectional study. Index assessment was the ∼45 min Brisbane Evidence-Based Language Test. The Brisbane Evidence-Based Language Test is further divided into four 15–25 min Short Tests: two Foundation Tests (severe impairment), Standard (moderate) and High Level Test (mild). Independent reference standard included the Language Screening Test, Aphasia Screening Test, Comprehensive Aphasia Test and/or Measure for Cognitive-Linguistic Abilities, treating team diagnosis and aphasia referral post-ward discharge. Results: Brisbane Evidence-Based Language Test cut-off score of ≤ 157 demonstrated 80.8% (LR+ =10.9) sensitivity and 92.6% (LR− =0.21) specificity. All Short Tests reported specificities of ≥ 92.6%. Foundation Tests I (cut-off ≤ 61) and II (cut-off ≤ 51) reported lower sensitivity (≥ 57.5%) given their focus on severe conditions. The Standard (cut-off ≤ 90) and High Level Test (cut-off ≤ 78) reported sensitivities of ≥ 72.6%. Conclusion: The Brisbane Evidence-Based Language Test is a sensitive assessment of aphasia. Diagnostically, the High Level Test recorded the highest psychometric capabilities of the Short Tests, equivalent to the full Brisbane Evidence-Based Language Test. The test is available for download from brisbanetest.org. Implications for rehabilitation: Aphasia is a debilitating condition and accurate identification of language disorders is important in healthcare. Language assessment is complex and the accuracy of assessment procedures is dependent upon a variety of factors. The Brisbane Evidence-Based Language Test is a new evidence-based language test specifically designed to adapt to varying patient need, clinical contexts and co-occurring conditions. In this cross-sectional validation study, the Brisbane Evidence-Based Language Test was found to be a sensitive measure for identifying aphasia in stroke.

DOI

10.1080/09638288.2020.1773547

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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