Title

Targeting the ABC transporter ABCB5 sensitizes glioblastoma to temozolomide-induced apoptosis through a cell-cycle checkpoint regulation mechanism

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

The Journal of Biological Chemistry

Publisher

NLM (Medline)

School

School of Medical and Health Sciences

Comments

Lee, C. A., Banerjee, P., Wilson, B. J., Wu, S., Guo, Q., Berg, G., ... & Emmerich, M. (2020). Targeting the ABC transporter ABCB5 sensitizes glioblastoma to temozolomide-induced apoptosis through a cell-cycle checkpoint regulation mechanism. Journal of Biological Chemistry, 295(22), 7774-7788. https://doi.org/10.1074/jbc.RA120.013778

Abstract

Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a malignant brain tumor with a poor prognosis resulting from tumor resistance to anticancer therapy and a high recurrence rate. Compelling evidence suggests that this is driven by subpopulations of cancer stem cells (CSCs) with tumor-initiating potential. ABC subfamily B member 5 (ABCB5) has been identified as a molecular marker for distinct subsets of chemoresistant tumor-initiating cell populations in diverse human malignancies. In the current study, we examined the potential role of ABCB5 in growth and chemoresistance of GBM. We found that ABCB5 is expressed in primary GBM tumors, in which its expression was significantly correlated with the CSC marker protein CD133 and with overall poor survival. Moreover, ABCB5 was also expressed by CD133-positive CSCs in the established human U-87 MG, LN-18, and LN-229 GBM cell lines. Antibody- or shRNA-mediated functional ABCB5 blockade inhibited proliferation and survival of GBM cells and sensitized them to temozolomide (TMZ)-induced apoptosis in vitro Likewise, in in vivo human GBM xenograft experiments with immunodeficient mice, mAb treatment inhibited growth of mutant TP53, WT PTEN LN-229 tumors, and sensitized LN-229 tumors to TMZ therapy. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that ABCB5 blockade inhibits TMZ-induced G2/M arrest and augments TMZ-mediated cell death. Our results identify ABCB5 as a GBM chemoresistance marker and point to the potential utility of targeting ABCB5 to improve current GBM therapies.

DOI

10.1074/jbc.RA120.013778

Share

 
COinS