Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Journal of Interprofessional Care

ISSN

13561820

Volume

34

Issue

4

First Page

472

Last Page

480

PubMed ID

31532268

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

School

School of Medical and Health Sciences

RAS ID

29707

Comments

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in [Journal of Interprofessional Care] on [18/09/2019], available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/[10.1080/13561820.2019.1659759].

Mills, B., Hansen, S., Nang, C., McDonald, H., Lyons-Wall, P., Hunt, J., & O’Sullivan, T. (2020). A pilot evaluation of simulation-based interprofessional education for occupational therapy, speech pathology and dietetic students: Improvements in attitudes and confidence. Journal of Interprofessional Care, 34(4), 472-480. https://doi.org/10.1080/13561820.2019.1659759

Abstract

© 2019, © 2019 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Many higher education institutions struggle to provide interprofessional practice opportunities for their pre-licensure students due to demanding workloads, difficulties with timetabling, and problems with sourcing suitable placements that provide appropriate practice opportunities. A series of complex unfolding video-based simulation scenarios involving a patient who had experienced a stroke was utilized as a case study for a three-hour interprofessional practice workshop. 69 occupational therapy (OT), speech pathology (SP) and dietetics (DT) students participated in a mixed-methods study comparing interprofessional attitudes before and after the workshop. Attitudes toward interprofessional practice improved pre- vs. post-workshop and overall. Students were highly satisfied with the workshops contribution toward learning, although OT and SP students were more satisfied than DT students. Focus groups confirmed students liked the format and structure of the workshop, suggested that students better understood the role of other professions and improved role clarification, increased their confidence to practice in interprofessional practice settings, but noted the experience could have been improved with the incorporation of nursing and smaller groups to better facilitate participation. There is widespread support for implementing interprofessional education (IPE) in the health sciences, yet widespread implementation is not yet a reality. This research suggests that a simulation-based, three-hour IPE workshop can have an immediate benefit on confidence and attitudes toward interprofessional practice for allied health students.

DOI

10.1080/13561820.2019.1659759

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