Title

Being ethical psychologists in correction settings

Document Type

Book Chapter

Publication Title

The Wiley International Handbook of Correctional Psychology

Publisher

Wiley

RAS ID

32172

Comments

Allan, A. (2019). Being Ethical Psychologists in Correction Settings. The Wiley International Handbook of Correctional Psychology, 30-44. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781119139980.ch2

Abstract

Drafters of codes recognize at least three principles, but they often subdivide them into more principles and use different nomenclature to describe them. This chapter structures the author's overview of the principles by distinguishing between eight overlapping principles; namely, responsibility, respect for humanity, respect for autonomy, justice, non‐maleficence, beneficence, integrity, and fidelity. Both law and ethics recognize the non‐maleficence principle, and psychologists generally find it easy to relate to this principle that requires them to avoid doing reasonably foreseeable harm to others. Psychologists confronted with moral (i.e., right and good) issues in their professional practice should search for solutions among the standards of their codes and, if necessary, apply the ethical principles. Many psychologists' moral uncertainty comes from their personal values. People's unique experiences, personalities, and learning, and external (e.g., cultural) influences shape their values and, though they mostly operate at an unconscious level, they influence people's automatic and deliberate decision‐making.

DOI

10.1002/9781119139980.ch2

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