Author Identifier

Stefan Iglauer

https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8080-1590

Ahmed Zarzor Al-Yaseri

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9094-1258

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control

ISSN

17505836

Volume

102

Publisher

Elsevier

School

School of Engineering

RAS ID

32316

Funders

Edith Cowan University - Open Access Support Scheme 2020

Comments

Iglauer, S., Al-Yaseri, A. Z., & Wolff-Boenisch, D. (2020). Basalt-CO2-brine wettability at storage conditions in basaltic formations. International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control, 102, article 103148. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijggc.2020.103148

Abstract

© 2020 Elsevier Ltd CO2 geo-storage in basaltic formations has recently been demonstrated as a viable solution to rapidly sequester and mineralize CO2. In case CO2 is injected into such basalt reservoirs in supercritical form, a two-phase system (reservoir brine and supercritical CO2) is created, and it is of key importance to specify the associated CO2-basalt wettability so that fluid distributions and CO2 flow through the reservoir can be predicted. However, there is a serious lack of data for basalt CO2-wettability. We therefore measured water contact angles on basalt substrates in CO2 atmosphere. The results indicate that at shallow depth (below 500 m) basalt is strongly water-wet. With increasing depth the basalt becomes less hydrophilic, and turns intermediate-wet at a depth of 900 m. We conclude that basalt is more CO2-wet than chemically clean minerals (quartz, calcite), especially at depths below 900 m. However, the basalt had a CO2-wettability similar to some caprock samples and a gas-reservoir sandstone. The data presented in this paper will thus aid in the prediction and optimization of CO2 geo-storage in basalt formations.

DOI

10.1016/j.ijggc.2020.103148

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Research Themes

Natural and Built Environments

Included in

Engineering Commons

Share

 
COinS