Title

Needs and Facebook addiction: How important are psychological well-being and performance-approach goals?

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Current Psychology

ISSN

10461310

Volume

39

Issue

6

First Page

1942

Last Page

1953

Publisher

Springer

School

School of Business and Law

RAS ID

30649

Funders

Thammasat University, External Grant

Comments

Annamalai, N., Foroughi, B., Iranmanesh, M., & Buathong, S. (2019). Needs and Facebook addiction: How important are psychological well-being and performance-approach goals?. Current Psychology, 39(6), 1942-1953. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12144-019-00516-2

Abstract

© 2019, Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature. Previous studies have highlighted the negative effect of Facebook addiction on students’ academic performance. The aim of the current research was to explore the effects of students’ needs on Facebook addiction by considering the moderating effect of psychological well-being. Moreover, the moderating effect of performance-approach goals on the relationship between Facebook addiction and academic performance was explored. A total of 343 university students from Thailand were recruited to participate in this study. The hypothesized model was analysed using the Partial Least Squares technique. The results demonstrate that the effects of social and entertainment needs on Facebook addiction were significant, while recognition and information needs had no effect on Facebook addiction. The results provide evidence of the moderating effect of psychological well-being on the relationship between entertainment needs and Facebook addiction. The findings also revealed that Facebook addiction has a negative association with academic performance and that performance-approach goals positively moderate this relationship. Our findings contribute to the literature on Facebook addiction by testing the moderating effects of psychological well-being and performance-approach goals.

DOI

10.1007/s12144-019-00516-2

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