Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy

Volume

13

First Page

3959

Last Page

3968

Publisher

Dove Press

School

School of Medical and Health Sciences

Funders

National Natural Science Foundation of China

Comments

Liu, Y., Tao, L., Zhang, J., Liu, J., Li, H., Liu, X., ... Guo, X. (2020). Impact of commuting mode on obesity among a working population in Beijing, China: Adjusting for air pollution. Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy, 13, 3959-3968. https://doi.org/10.2147/DMSO.S265537

Abstract

© 2020 Liu et al. Background: Few studies have considered the interplay between commuting mode and air pollution on obesity. The aim of this study was to examine whether workplace air pollutants exposure modifying the associations between different commuting mode and obesity. Methods: A cross-sectional study of workers in Beijing was conducted in 2016. The study sample comprised 10,524 participants aged 18 to 65 years old. Outcomes were defined as overall obesity (BMI ≥ 28 kg/m2) and abdominal obesity (WC ≥ 85 cm in men and WC ≥ 80 cm in women). Commuting modes were divided into walking, cycling, bus, subway, and car or taxi. Logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios relating commuting mode to overall and abdominal obesity and stratified by gender, controlling for covariates. Results: The association between commuting mode and obesity was more strongly in men than women. In the fully adjusted models, compared with car or taxi commuters, cycling (men: OR=0.37, 95% CI=0.20 to 0.68) or bus (men: OR=0.58, 95% CI=0.36 to 0.94) counterparts had a lower risk of overall obesity. Compared with car or taxi commuters, walking (men: OR=0.57, 95% CI=0.36 to 0.91), bus (men: OR=0.59, 95% CI=0.39 to 0.89), or subway (men: OR=0.59, 95% CI=0.39 to 0.89) counterparts had a lower risk of abdominal obesity. We observed significant interactions between exposure PM10 and cycling on overall obesity in men. After adjusting for air pollutants, the association between commuting mode and obesity was slightly strengthened. Conclusion: This study findings indicate that active (walking or cycling) or public (bus or subway) commuting modes were protected factors for overall and abdominal obesity among men. Air pollutants do not obscure the benefits of active or public commuting for obesity. These associations support the policy for increasing active or public commuting as a strategy to reduce the prevalence of obesity.

DOI

10.2147/DMSO.S265537

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 License

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