Title

Exploring the association between food insecurity and food skills among school-aged children

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Public Health Nutrition

ISSN

13689800

Volume

23

Issue

11

First Page

2000

Last Page

2005

PubMed ID

10.1017/S1368980019004300

Publisher

Cambridge University Press

School

School of Medical and Health Sciences

RAS ID

31446

Funders

Collaborative Research and Innovation Opportunities (CRIO) Team Prgramme from Alberta Innovates Banting Postdoctoral Fellowship Edith Cowan University

Comments

Blanchet, R., Loewen, O. K., Godrich, S. L., Willows, N., & Veugelers, P. (2020). Exploring the association between food insecurity and food skills among school-aged children. Public Health Nutrition, 23(11), 2000-2005. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1368980019004300

Abstract

© The Authors 2020. Objective:To examine the relationship between household food insecurity (FI) and children's involvement in family meal choices and food preparation, used as proxies for children's food skills, and to explore gender differences within these associations.Design:Households were classified as food-secure or food-insecure using the six-item, short-form Household Food Security Survey Module. Children's involvement in family meal choices and food preparation were treated as proxies for children's food skills. Mixed-effects multinomial logistic regression models were used.Setting:Public schools in Nova Scotia, Canada.Participants:5244 children in the fifth grade (10-11 years old) participating in the Children's Lifestyle and School Performance Study (CLASS).Results:Most children reported being involved in family meal choices or food preparation at least weekly (74 and 68 %). The likelihood of helping choose family meals once a week was 33 % lower among girls from food-insecure households compared to girls from food-secure households. No differences in boys' involvement in family meal choices were observed according to household FI status. Boys from food-insecure households were 65 % more likely than boys from food-secure households to assist with food preparation/cooking four times per week. No differences in girls' involvement in food preparation were observed according to household FI status.Conclusions:Findings support that household FI is not due to a lack of food skills but most likely due to inadequate access to resources. This supports the call for upstream policies targeting the structural issues underpinning household FI such as low income.

DOI

10.1017/S1368980019004300

Research Themes

Health

Priority Areas

Exercise, nutrition, lifestyle and other interventions for optimal health across the lifespan

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