Title

Start healthy & stay healthy a workplace health promotion intervention for new graduate nurses: Study protocol

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Collegian

ISSN

13227696

Volume

27

Issue

5

First Page

573

Last Page

580

PubMed ID

10.1016/j.colegn.2019.12.005

Publisher

Elsevier

School

School of Nursing and Midwifery

RAS ID

35215

Funders

Sydney Local Health District

Comments

Brogan, E., Duffield, C., & Denney-Wilson, E. (2020). Start healthy & stay healthy a workplace health promotion intervention for new graduate nurses: Study protocol. Collegian, 27(5), 573-580. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.colegn.2019.12.005

Abstract

© 2019 Australian College of Nursing Ltd Aim: This paper outlines the protocol for a feasibility study to examine the dietary and physical activity behaviours of new graduate nurses and to implement and evaluate the effectiveness of a workplace health promotion intervention to assist new graduate nurses in adopting or maintaining behaviours. Design: A sequential explanatory mixed-methods study. Methods: The study is informed by the Behaviour Change Wheel. It will be conducted for twelve months and will recruit all new graduate nurses employed at a local health district who are participating in a transition to practice program. A workplace health promotion intervention will be embedded in the transition to practice program for the intervention group, allocated according to the hospital of employment. The study will assess changes to health knowledge, dietary habits and physical activity behaviours measured at baseline, 6-weeks and 6-months. Semi-structured interviews will be conducted with intervention group participants at 6-months. Descriptive statistics will be used to present demographic data. Chi-squared Tests of Independence and Generalised Mixed Models will be used to analyse categorical data. Poisson Regression will be used to analyse continuous data. Qualitative data will be analysed thematically. Discussion: Nurses need to engage in healthy lifestyle behaviours to ensure they can meet the rising demand for healthcare. However, experienced nurses often have poor dietary and physical activity behaviours. There is limited research examining these behaviours among new graduate nurses as they are starting their careers and forming workplace habits.

DOI

10.1016/j.colegn.2019.12.005

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