Title

Player wellness (soreness and stress) and injury in elite junior Australian football players over 1 season

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance

ISSN

15550265

Volume

15

Issue

10

First Page

1422

Last Page

1429

Publisher

Human Kinetics Publishers Inc

School

Exercise Medicine Research Institute

RAS ID

35363

Comments

Lathlean, T. J. H., Gastin, P. B., Newstead, S. V., & Finch, C. F. (2020). Player wellness (soreness and stress) and injury in elite junior Australian football players over 1 season. International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, 15(10), 1422-1429. https://doi.org/10.1123/ijspp.2019-0828

Abstract

© 2020 Human Kinetics, Inc. Purpose: To investigate the association between player wellness and injury in elite junior Australian football players over 1 competitive season. Methods: Prospective cohort study. Elite junior Australian football players (N = 196, average age = 17.7 y, range = 16–18 y) were recruited in the under-18 state league competition in Victoria, Australia. They recorded their wellness (sleep, fatigue, soreness, stress, and mood) according to a 5-point Likert scale 3 times weekly, with injuries (missed match/ training session) entered into an online sport-injury surveillance system. A logistic generalized estimating equation was used to examine the association (expressed as odds ratio [OR]) between wellness and injury (yes/no). Results: Soreness was associated with injury at each time point across the week, with the strongest association evident for soreness reported 6 d postmatch (OR = 1.30; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.17–1.44; P < .001). Stress and injury were associated with injury for average stress values across the week, as well as specifically on day 1 postmatch (OR = 1.10; 95% CI, 1.01–1.21; P = .038). Mood reported in the middle of the week (3 d postmatch) was associated with injury (OR = 0.87; 95% CI, 0.78–0.97; P = .014), as was fatigue (OR = 1.10; 95% CI, 1.00–1.22; P = .044). Conclusions: This study demonstrates key associations between wellness and injury in elite junior Australian football, specifically soreness, stress, fatigue, and mood. Monitoring strategies help identify injury-risk profiles, which can help decision makers (coaches or medical staff) intervene when relevant to reduce injury risk.

DOI

10.1123/ijspp.2019-0828

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