Title

Epilogue: Harnessing the experimental and clinical resources to address service imperatives in multiethnic aphasia caseloads

Document Type

Other

Publication Title

Aphasiology

ISSN

02687038

Volume

34

Issue

11

First Page

1451

Last Page

1455

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

School

School of Medical and Health Sciences

RAS ID

35343

Comments

Centeno, J. G., Kiran, S., & Armstrong, E. (2020). Epilogue: Harnessing the experimental and clinical resources to address service imperatives in multiethnic aphasia caseloads. Aphasiology, 34(11), 1451-1455. https://doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2020.1781421

Abstract

© 2020 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Background: Decisive efforts are needed to expand the experimental, professional, and clinical foundations that will strengthen service provision and minimize service disparities in the growing ethno-geriatric caseloads with aphasia in post-stroke rehabilitation worldwide. Aim: The purpose of this Special Issue was to provide an international, multi-perspective overview of the breadth and depth in the research evidence and clinical approaches needed to support scientifically-based, culturally secure services for ethno-racially and multilingually diverse aphasia caseloads. Main Contribution: The articles in this Special Issue highlighted a sample of the broad neuroscientific, linguistic, cognitive, ethnographic, and sociocultural bases required to solidify evidence-based, culturally-attuned aphasia management in the burgeoning multiethnic groups in adult neurorehabilitation programs across the world. Conclusions: The combined effect of marked population aging and extensive increase in ethno-racial diversity worldwide steadily has resulted in burgeoning ethno-geriatric groups in post-stroke care, including aphasia services, across the world. Systemic efforts that synergistically bring together research, policy-making, and society are crucial to generate the research evidence, develop the policies, and create the attitudes that will strengthen the clinical services for the growing ethno-geriatric groups with post-stroke disabilities, including aphasia.

DOI

10.1080/02687038.2020.1781421

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