Title

Vertical jump testing in rugby league: A rationale for calculating take-off momentum

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Journal of Applied Biomechanics

Volume

36

Issue

6

First Page

370

Last Page

374

PubMed ID

32796137

Publisher

Human Kinetics

School

School of Medical and Health Sciences

RAS ID

35382

Comments

McMahon, J. J., Lake, J. P., Ripley, N. J., & Comfort, P. (2020). Vertical jump testing in rugby league: A rationale for calculating take-off momentum. Journal of Applied Biomechanics, 36(6), 370-374. https://doi.org/10.1123/JAB.2020-0100

Abstract

© 2020 Human Kinetics Publishers Inc.. All rights reserved. The purpose of this study was to determine the usefulness of calculating jump take-off momentum in rugby league (RL) by exploring its relationship with sprint momentum, due to the latter being an important attribute of this sport. Twenty-five male RL players performed 3 maximal-effort countermovement jumps on a force platform and 3 maximal effort 20-m sprints (with split times recorded). Jump take-off momentum and sprint momentum (between 0 and 5, 5 and 10, and 10 and 20 m) were calculated (mass multiplied by velocity) and their relationship determined. There was a very large positive relationship between both jump take-off and 0- to 5-m sprint momentum (r = .781, P < .001) and jump take-off and 5- to 10-m sprint momentum (r = .878, P < .001). There was a nearly perfect positive relationship between jump take-off and 10- to 20-m sprint momentum (r = .920, P < .001). Jump take-off and sprint momentum demonstrated good-excellent reliability and very large-nearly perfect associations (61%-85% common variance) in an RL cohort, enabling prediction equations to be created. Thus, it may be practically useful to calculate jump take-off momentum as part of routine countermovement jump testing of RL players and other collisionsport athletes to enable the indirect monitoring of sprint momentum.

DOI

10.1123/JAB.2020-0100

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