Title

Vertical jump testing in rugby league: A rationale for calculating take-off momentum

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Journal of Applied Biomechanics

Volume

36

Issue

6

First Page

370

Last Page

374

PubMed ID

32796137

Publisher

Human Kinetics

School

School of Medical and Health Sciences

Comments

McMahon, J. J., Lake, J. P., Ripley, N. J., & Comfort, P. (2020). Vertical jump testing in rugby league: A rationale for calculating take-off momentum. Journal of Applied Biomechanics, 36(6), 370-374. https://doi.org/10.1123/JAB.2020-0100

Abstract

© 2020 Human Kinetics Publishers Inc.. All rights reserved. The purpose of this study was to determine the usefulness of calculating jump take-off momentum in rugby league (RL) by exploring its relationship with sprint momentum, due to the latter being an important attribute of this sport. Twenty-five male RL players performed 3 maximal-effort countermovement jumps on a force platform and 3 maximal effort 20-m sprints (with split times recorded). Jump take-off momentum and sprint momentum (between 0 and 5, 5 and 10, and 10 and 20 m) were calculated (mass multiplied by velocity) and their relationship determined. There was a very large positive relationship between both jump take-off and 0- to 5-m sprint momentum (r = .781, P < .001) and jump take-off and 5- to 10-m sprint momentum (r = .878, P < .001). There was a nearly perfect positive relationship between jump take-off and 10- to 20-m sprint momentum (r = .920, P < .001). Jump take-off and sprint momentum demonstrated good-excellent reliability and very large-nearly perfect associations (61%-85% common variance) in an RL cohort, enabling prediction equations to be created. Thus, it may be practically useful to calculate jump take-off momentum as part of routine countermovement jump testing of RL players and other collisionsport athletes to enable the indirect monitoring of sprint momentum.

DOI

10.1123/JAB.2020-0100

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