Title

Outcomes in buried versus non-buried peritoneal dialysis catheters: A retrospective cohort study

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Journal of Vascular Access

ISSN

11297298

Publisher

SAGE

School

School of Medical and Health Sciences

RAS ID

35198

Comments

Tan, R., Weng, W., Raymond, W. D., & Sieunarine, K. (2020). Outcomes in buried versus non-buried peritoneal dialysis catheters: A retrospective cohort study. The Journal of Vascular Access, 22(2), 254-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/1129729820937111

Abstract

© The Author(s) 2020. Aims: To compare the rates of infections (peritonitis and exit site infections) in patients undergoing non-buried versus buried peritoneal dialysis catheterisation for end-stage renal failure. Methods: A retrospective review of all patients who underwent peritoneal dialysis catheter placement by one primary surgeon between January 2008 and August 2019. Information collected included, catheter characteristics, immediate post-operative complications, date of catheter exteriorisation, date of peritoneal dialysis commencement, rate of successful catheter function at initiation of peritoneal dialysis and rates of catheter-related complications (i.e. infection, revision status and obstruction). Results: 110 peritoneal dialysis catheters were inserted (43 non-buried and 67 buried peritoneal dialysis catheters). The non-buried group was associated with a higher proportion acquiring an infection than the buried group (15% vs 30%, p = 0.054). Patients with buried catheters also had a 72% and 65% decreased likelihood of experiencing a catheter-related infection and peritonitis, respectively, over time compared to patients with non-buried catheters in the unadjusted (crude incidence rate ratio 0.28, 95% confidence interval 0.11, 0.70; P = 0.003). The proportion of catheter function at first use was 85% in the non-buried group and 78% in the buried group. Patients with non-buried versus buried catheters had similar proportions of complications, including: obstructions (25.6% vs 20.9%, p = 0.770), herniation (7.0% vs 4.0%, p = 0.327) and leaks (7.0% vs 1.5%, p = 0.134). Conclusion: The use of the buried peritoneal dialysis catheter technique as compared to the standard technique has revealed fewer overall catheter-related infections, particularly episodes of peritonitis and similar rates of mechanical complications in our series. In addition to that, the other benefits of buried peritoneal dialysis catheters such as lower healthcare cost, patient convenience and a viable option for patients in remote communities should prompt physicians to continue assessing suitable candidates for buried peritoneal dialysis catheters.

DOI

10.1177/1129729820937111

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