Title

Muslims in a 'White Australia': Colour or Religion?

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

Faculty

Education and Arts

School

Communications and Arts, Centre for Research in Entertainment, Arts,Technology, Education and Communications

RAS ID

4877

Comments

This article was originally published as: Kabir, N. (2006). Muslims in a ‘White Australia’: Colour or religion?. Immigrants & Minorities, 24(2), 193-223. Original available here

Abstract

Muslim migration to Australia took place over three distinct periods – the Colonial, the ‘White Australia’ and the Multicultural periods. This article discusses the settlement issues of Muslims during the ‘White Australia’ period (1901–73). It particularly focuses on five distinct ethnic groups – Indians, Afghans, Malays, Javanese and Albanians – in Queensland and Western Australia. It questions whether these groups were treated ‘differently' because of their Islamic beliefs. The study draws upon both primary and secondary sources, including archival materials and oral testimonies. From the evidence presented, it is clear that a hardening attitude against Muslims has been apparent and that historical antipathies and long-lived antipathies have grown in the specific context of the current geopolitical climate

DOI

10.1080/02619280600863671

 

Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.1080/02619280600863671