Title

The effect of salt stress and abscisic acid on proline production, chlorophyll content and growth of in vitro propagated shoots of Eucalyptus camaldulensis

Document Type

Journal Article

Faculty

Computing, Health and Science

School

School of Computer and Information Science, Centre for Ecosystem Management

RAS ID

2985

Comments

Originally published as: Woodward, A. J., & Bennett, I. J. (2005). The effect of salt stress and abscisic acid on proline production, chlorophyll content and growth of in vitro propagated shoots of Eucalyptus camaldulensis. Plant Cell, Tissue and organ culture, 82(2), 189-200. Original article available here

Abstract

Three clones, selected for their variation in salt tolerance, were examined regarding their growth and physiological responses on exposure to salt (NaCl) and abscisic acid (ABA) in vitro. The shoot proline levels significantly increased in two salt tolerant clones when exposed to 100 mM NaCl in the shoot multiplication medium. In contrast, proline in a salt sensitive clone did not change in comparison to the control treatment. When 10 micromolar ABA was included in the medium all clones had an increase in proline regardless of whether they were salt tolerant or salt sensitive, linking proline production to the stress hormone ABA. Callus production was so variable that it was not possible to produce callus of consistent texture, colour and growth for all three clones. For the two clones where consistent growth was achievable, both the salt tolerant and salt sensitive clones increased proline production when exposed to salt. This response, however, was greater in the salt tolerant clone. Other parameters examined were growth (dry weight) and shoot chlorophyll content. These characteristics did not correlate with the salt tolerance of the clones, with similar weights being produced on non salt and salt media and similar chlorophyll in both salt sensitive and salt tolerant clones regardless of the medium in which they were grown. The production of proline is considered with regard to selection for differences in salt tolerance in vitro.

DOI

10.1007/s11240-005-0515-4

Access Rights

free_to_read

 

Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.1007/s11240-005-0515-4