Document Type

Conference Proceeding

Publisher

Edith Cowan University

Faculty

Community Services, Education and Social Sciences

School

Communications and Multimedia

RAS ID

1645

Comments

This article was originally published as: Permvattana, R. , Oliver, R. G., Bate, F., & Macnish, J. (2003). Designing accessible on-line environments for the visually impaired. Proceedings of EDU-COM 2002. (pp. 274 - 283 pages). Khon Kaen, Thailand. Edith Cowan University. Original article available here

Abstract

Providing accessible Web pages is becoming a key concern for many providers of electronic information. There are many people who find accessing Web pages difficult and among these, vision impaired users are perhaps the group with the greatest needs. The Web is a strong visual environment and most designers use this aspect of the environment as a critical element in their interface and information design. Such strategies, while providing many opportunities for mainstream Web users, provide limiting and impeding outcomes for visually impaired Web users. There are a number of accessibility standards that now exist to inform and guide the designers of Web pages but little is known about precisely how best these standards can be applied and achieved. This paper will describe a study undertaken in the Australian context that sought to explore how the goals of accessibility influenced the design process and the design outcomes of an online learning environment designed to cater for visually impaired users. It is a study of the TruVision Project, a Web-based learning setting, designed to aid visually impaired users to gain an elementary qualification in Information Technology.

 
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